June 04, 2021 1 min read

There are endless definitions of the word culture itself. Gallup believes that organizational culture simply comes down to "how we do things around here." Confidently displaying, for the world to see, how work gets done in your organization informs how employees and customers alike perceive and choose to interact with you.

Given this, it may bewilder you to find out that when Gallup talks to executives at organizations that have incredibly strong brands, they often sheepishly admit they don't even know what their culture is. They cannot express in words what their current or aspirational culture is supposed to be.

Culture is often an unwritten code. Unfortunately, when leaders don't have a clearly defined or codified culture, their vision can be easily overlooked or inconsistently interpreted across the organization.

The consequences of an inconsistent, unclear workplace culture can be dire because front-line managers and employees ultimately create the local culture on their teams. If employees don't understand leaders' vision for the culture, their actions won't support -- or worse, will inhibit -- that ideal culture. This can result in a work environment that is chaotic and disengaging, where employees feel creatively stifled and leaders struggle to realize their strategic aims.

To read the full Gallup article, click the link below:

https://www.gallup.com/workplace/329312/harness-power-organizational-culture-steps.aspx

Authored by Iseult Morgan & Nate Dvorak

 

Alex Waddell
Alex Waddell



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